strategy

Training in water management

Synonyms:
Increasing programmes for water management training
Managing hydrological cycles
Training skills in water cycle management
Training water managers
Providing training to water resource professionals
Adopting innovative approaches for training water resource experts
Providing training to water agency staff
Description:
Training of water managers at all levels so that they have an appropriate understanding of all the elements necessary for their decision-making.
Context:
Water use in many parts of the world is unsustainable, and aquatic ecosystems suffer from environmental degradation. Improved management of water use and aquatic ecosystems is needed, and this may be facilitated by providing training skills. There is a concensus that water management training skills should be taught from an integrated approach.

To effectively plan and manage water-supply and sanitation at the national, provincial, district and community level, and to utilize funds most effectively, trained professional and technical staff must be developed within each country in sufficient numbers. To do this, countries must establish manpower development plans, taking into consideration present requirements and planned developments. Subsequently, the development and performance of country-level training institutions should be enhanced so that they can play a pivotal role in capacity-building.

Implementation:
This strategy features in the framework of Agenda 21 as formulated at UNCED (Rio de Janeiro, 1992), now coordinated by the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development and implemented through national and local authorities.

Agenda 21 recommends increasing formal and informal training activities for personnel at all levels, including farmers, fishermen and members of local communities, with particular reference to women. It also recommends that training activities should be undertaken periodically at all levels within the organizations responsible for water-quality management, including development of training skills, in-service training, problem-solving workshops and refresher training courses should be adopted for specific aspects of water-quality monitoring and control.

Innovative teaching approaches should be adopted for professional and managerial staff training in order to cope with changing needs and challenges. Flexibility and adaptability regarding emerging water pollution issues should be developed.

To effectively plan and manage water-supply and sanitation at the national, provincial, district and community level, and to utilize funds most effectively, trained professional and technical staff must be developed within each country in sufficient numbers. To do this, countries must establish manpower development plans, taking into consideration present requirements and planned developments. Subsequently, the development and performance of country-level training institutions should be enhanced so that they can play a pivotal role in capacity-building.

Article 9 of the [Draft Protocol on Water and Health] (1999) to the [Convention on the Protection and Use of Transboundary Watercourses and International Lakes] (1992), states: (2) The Parties shall promote: (a) Understanding of the public-health aspects of their work by those responsible for water management, water supply and sanitation; and (b) Understanding of the basic principles of water management, water supply and sanitation by those responsible for public health. (3) The Parties shall encourage the education and training of the professional and technical staff who are needed for managing water resources and for operating systems of water supply and sanitation, and encourage the updating and improvement of their knowledge and skills. This education and training shall include relevant aspects of public health.

Subjects:
Hydrology
Water
Resources
Maternity, paternity
Human resources
Staff
Professions
Agency
Expertise
Training
Management
Type Classification:
E: Emanations of other strategies