Problem

Disruption of territorial integrity

Other Names:
Denial of rights to territorial integrity
Nature:

The integrity of territory, particularly a small one, may be disrupted when the territory is separated legally, administratively and politically from the larger territory of which it was a part. Equally disruptive is the partial or complete replacement of the original population of a territory by immigrants, the demands of whose descendents must be considered along with those of the legitimate indigenous inhabitants. In another sense, a downstream riparian state may also consider that its territorial integrity has been disrupted when an upstream state reduces the quantity of the river flow or changes its quality.

Incidence:

In the case of small territories, the problem is mainly a heritage from the past and is likely to be replaced by the problem of territorial fragmentation. Examples include: claim of Spain against the UK concerning the status of Gibraltar; claim of Morocco against Spain concerning Ifni; claim of Guatemala against the United Kingdom concerning British Honduras; claim of Argentina against the UK concerning the Falkland Islands.

Narrower Problems:
Enclaves and exclaves
Related Problems:
Denial of state's rights
Related UN Sustainable Development Goals:
GOAL 16: Peace and Justice Strong Institutions
Problem Type:
C: Cross-sectoral problems
Date of last update
10.07.2019 – 18:35 CEST